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Sui Wall in Ningxia

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  • Sui Wall in Ningxia

    According to the maps on this forum, there is a Sui Dynasty Wall in Ningxia from Shuidonggou to Yanchi, can anyone confirm this ?
    Last edited by Ken; 07-05-2010, 05:11 AM. Reason: typed wrong words

  • #2
    Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

    Originally posted by Ken View Post
    According to the maps on this forum, there is a Sui Dynasty Wall in Ningxia from Shuidonggou to Yanchi, can anyone confirm this ?
    Wat is exactly your question? You have the "Other Dynasty" File and there is shown the Sui Wall (or at least my interpretation of what I found in the field and can see on GE).

    I found it because your photos showed an older wall along the Ming GW.


    -chinoook
    chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
    chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
    chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

    The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

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    • #3
      Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

      Yes that is right ! My question is, is it Sui definitely because last time we could not identify which dynasty the wall belonged to ?

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      • #4
        Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

        As about always we lack archeological evidence since no one of us went there and dug for ceramics or the like.
        But there was Sui GW along that section, it is well known from historical reports. And since it is clear it is not Ming and older than Ming and no other wall is probable there it should be Sui. More evidence to come ;-).
        The most relevant question was and is: Is it maybe (early) Ming? But I think from the untypical shape both in towers and in the wall (unlike all rammed earth Ming walls) we can judge it is of a complete different period.


        -chinoook
        Last edited by chinoook; 07-05-2010, 07:09 AM.
        chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
        chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
        chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

        The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

          OK Chinoook, together with CH312/Outofnowhere, this is part of my mission in September then. I will get the photos to you and try to find the evidence for you !!!

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          • #6
            Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

            To the east of the Ming Wall,lies the Sui Wall.I am indeed certain that it is Sui and not Ming due to the height of the wall and the state of the wall.
            The Sui wall is lower than the Ming and has more plant growth
            on it. You could argue that it is early Ming But the distance
            between the two walls does not warrant this arguement. Furthermore,
            on closer inspection of the Wall, it " looks" different from the
            Ming Wall! It is regrettable that I did not take a tape-measure to determine
            the height of the different rammed eath structures to compare
            the different dynasties.
            The first photo shows apparently a Sui Tower; further back is a Ming Fortress and tower.









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            • #7
              Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

              This is the point where the Double Sui/Ming Walls "separate" !
              Left is the Sui Wall and right is the Ming Wall !

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              • #8
                Re: Sui Wall in Ningxia

                A possible Sui Tower in front of the Ming Wall. Chinoook, I need your help in confirming this?

                The second photo is the Sui Wall on the right; with the Ming Wall to the left and a Ming Fortress further to the left.

                The third photo is a cross section of the Sui Wall.





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