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  • #31
    Re: Ningxia riddle

    Originally posted by Kim View Post
    I did notice that, but with my Hebei experience I have learned to respect/fear those kinds of roads - or at least my car has. Maybe the quality of this kind of roads is better in Ningxia.
    Especially here it is _very_ good. The transported all the wind turbines have been brought there, there are many cars going there and away every day. You can even buy things there (Robert did) or have a meal in the cantine (I did) ;-).
    So absolutely no excuses not to explore the Qin GW!


    -chinoook
    chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
    chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
    chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

    The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Ningxia riddle

      Originally posted by chinoook View Post
      Especially here it is _very_ good. The transported all the wind turbines have been brought there, there are many cars going there and away every day. You can even buy things there (Robert did) or have a meal in the cantine (I did) ;-).
      So absolutely no excuses not to explore the Qin GW!


      -chinoook
      That sound very tempting then

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Ningxia riddle

        I just got the plane tickets today, so I will be going to Ningxia on September 10 and return September 13. That give me at least one weekend to look for Great Wall

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Ningxia riddle

          I found this Ningxia map i a book about the history of Ningxia:



          I've don't remember seeing other maps with Ming wall in this area: 37

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Ningxia riddle

            This is marvellous work, Kim! The paths are very correct, obviously the Qin wall at Guyang.
            I have seen maps with wall at the shown location and read about it but was always sceptical. But now I start to believe and wait for HR imagery.


            -chinoook
            chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
            chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
            chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

            The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Ningxia riddle

              Originally posted by chinoook View Post
              This is marvellous work, Kim! The paths are very correct, obviously the Qin wall at Guyang.
              I have seen maps with wall at the shown location and read about it but was always sceptical. But now I start to believe and wait for HR imagery.


              -chinoook
              I only managed to find a few books in Ningxia with only a few pages describing the Ningxia GW. When my wife has time I will ask her to try to find some information in the books. The book with the map was almost 500 RMB and only contained a few GW related pages, so I just grabbed my camera to take a picture of the map.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Ningxia riddle

                Anyhow it is of incredible value since it shows us a Wall where we did not expect one.


                -chinoook
                chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
                chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
                chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

                The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Ningxia riddle

                  Originally posted by Kim View Post
                  I only managed to find a few books in Ningxia with only a few pages describing the Ningxia GW. When my wife has time I will ask her to try to find some information in the books. The book with the map was almost 500 RMB and only contained a few GW related pages, so I just grabbed my camera to take a picture of the map.
                  Well done!
                  Bryan

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Ningxia riddle

                    Originally posted by chinoook View Post
                    Anyhow it is of incredible value since it shows us a Wall where we did not expect one.


                    -chinoook
                    btw, two model landscapes in the Yinchuan Museum also showed a wall here.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Ningxia riddle

                      I know this is not the right place for map submissions, but since we are discussing the Ningxia riddle here, I choose to put it here.

                      What do you think about this one:

                      I forgot a pin for the tower here: 37
                      Last edited by Kim; 09-15-2009, 11:12 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Ningxia riddle

                        A few updates:

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                        • #42
                          Re: Ningxia riddle

                          I think you found it (I did not when looking there ).
                          It is hard to imagine that there was no defense to the west and no continuation at least to the mountain in the west.

                          And yes, it is not the right submission location here. The "Ningxia riddle" was the question how did the Ming defend to the north, not where the is any Wall in Ningxia.


                          -chinoook
                          chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
                          chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
                          chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

                          The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: Ningxia riddle

                            Originally posted by chinoook View Post
                            And yes, it is not the right submission location here. The "Ningxia riddle" was the question how did the Ming defend to the north, not where the is any Wall in Ningxia.
                            Well, this section was already discussed a bit in this thread, and the findings seems to end that discussion: yes, there is wall in that location!

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              A new Aspects and one left Questions about the Ningxia GW

                              1. Somewhere (a mid-reliable source as I remember) I found the information that early Ming build a section of the GW south west of Yinchuan which later "was covered in sand" and forced the Ming to build a new section at the Helanshan Wind Farm and Sanguankou section (which is what was always contained in our maps). The older and abandoned wall is very probably what I found earlier around 38
                              Last edited by chinoook; 01-31-2010, 11:37 AM.
                              chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
                              chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
                              chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

                              The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

                              Comment

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