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  • Photos! Xiamaguan (下马关)

    Next to Hebei my favourite Great Wall province is Ningxia and I had the luck of visiting the province a few times on business trips, so why not mix business with pleasure and spend the weekend at the Great Wall.

    This time I went all the way down to Xiamaguan in the southeast part of Ningxia. From Yinchuan it

  • #2
    Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

    Thanks very much for the impressive photos.

    Is there any evidence any of the beacon tower had stone/brick coverage?

    Did you learn anything about the "small signal towers" or "ovens"?

    Do you think the chain of beacon towers north of Xiamaguan is a barrier to the east or rather to the west?



    -chinoook
    chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
    chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
    chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

    The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

      Is there any evidence any of the beacon tower had stone/brick coverage?
      At some places there were remains of bricks and especially roof tiles. Also some decorative bricks with carvings.



      Did you learn anything about the "small signal towers" or "ovens"?
      Not really. They were mainly a pile of stones so difficult to see their original construction.

      Do you think the chain of beacon towers north of Xiamaguan is a barrier to the east or rather to the west?
      Could this be a chain of warning towers to warn the Interior Great Wall about and an enemy invasion trough the main wall in the north?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

        Originally posted by Kim View Post
        At some places there were remains of bricks and especially roof tiles. Also some decorative bricks with carvings.
        This is found frequently under Ming Towers in the whole west. I assume that bricks and roof tiles where only in use for the builing on top of the rammed earth tower. I assume there was no real coverage on the Xiamaguan towers.


        Not really. They were mainly a pile of stones so difficult to see their original construction.
        ... like all of those I visited so far ...

        Could this be a chain of warning towers to warn the Interior Great Wall about and an enemy invasion trough the main wall in the north?
        The orientation of the "small signal towers" or "ovens" indicates a communication perpendicular to the row.


        -chinooook
        chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
        chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
        chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

        The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

          ... like all of those I visited so far ...
          To be honest I didn't spend that much time at them. Three people were waiting for me in the car and spend their day off to drive around with me, so I didn't have that much time to go into details.

          The orientation of the "small signal towers" or "ovens" indicates a communication perpendicular to the row.
          Maybe not so much a direct connection between the two walls, but maybe a line of warning towers in "no man's land".

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

            Originally posted by chinoook View Post
            Do you think the chain of beacon towers north of Xiamaguan is a barrier to the east or rather to the west?
            -chinoook
            the chain of beacon towers in Kim's pictures locate east of Xiamaguan, so i thought they are barriers to the south.

            And thanks Kim to share those pictures , i felt heavy wind at home too .

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

              These are great photos. Too bad about the sandstorm. It seems that the day started out very nice and clear.

              Why don't these photos have any Exif data (particularly, GPS data)?
              Bryan

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                Originally posted by Kim View Post
                Maybe not so much a direct connection between the two walls, but maybe a line of warning towers in "no man's land".
                On both sides (norteast and southwest) I do not see any structures within the next 15km. So this question is still unanswered ....


                -chinoook
                chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
                chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
                chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

                The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                  Originally posted by Bryan View Post
                  These are great photos. Too bad about the sandstorm. It seems that the day started out very nice and clear.

                  Why don't these photos have any Exif data (particularly, GPS data)?
                  Indeed. The weather was very nice in the beginning of the day, but around lunch time the wind became more and more strong and the end of the wall there were not much to keep the sand from blowing so it got worse and worse further away from the city.

                  I used save for the web in photoshop which delete all exif data. Later I will post a GE file with these and more photos.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                    Originally posted by andarchen View Post
                    the chain of beacon towers in Kim's pictures locate east of Xiamaguan, so i thought they are barriers to the south.
                    The chain is north of Xiamaguan ( 37
                    chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
                    chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
                    chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

                    The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                      Originally posted by chinoook View Post
                      On both sides (norteast and southwest) I do not see any structures within the next 15km. So this question is still unanswered ....


                      -chinoook
                      It would be too boring anyway without unanswered questions

                      Definitely a place I would like to go back to - on a day without sandstorm...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                        Foretress of Xiamaguan was built in year 1577 Ming dynasty , west wall was destoried by flood during Qing dynasty , west wall was restored but right shift a couple of meters in year 1876 Qing dynasty . The original west wall is still visible in GE image.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                          Originally posted by andarchen View Post
                          Foretress of Xiamaguan was built in year 1577 Ming dynasty , west wall was destoried by flood during Qing dynasty , west wall was restored but right shift a couple of meters in year 1876 Qing dynasty . The original west wall is still visible in GE image.
                          The stone tablet at the south gate say the 9th year of Wanli, which is later than 1577

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                            Originally posted by Kim View Post
                            The stone tablet at the south gate say the 9th year of Wanli, which is later than 1577
                            The construction year of Xiamaguan based on book written in 1821 of Qing dynasty , name of book is History of Pingyuan couty"平远县志",here is the book link:
                            http://www.gd-info.gov.cn/shtml/pyx/.../10/5782.shtml

                            It is said there was another existing tablet on another south gate , the year of that tablet was the 10th year of Wanli . The main gate of this fortress shoud be the northern gate , maybe there was another tablet on northern gate and written in the 5th year of Wanli.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Xiamaguan (下马关)

                              For those interested in this area, here's a Google Earth file with some of the photos already posted and several new ones.

                              All positions according to the geotag by Nikon GP-1.

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