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  • Markings at tower

    I've seen these kind of markings before at Taolinkou and again at Liangjiawan.

    I guess they would be used to help the soldiers aim at the approaching enemy, like can be seen in some 20th century fortifications as well.




  • #2
    What are these?

    You think these were for old weapons like bow and arrow, or for modern use with rifles?

    Is it just me, or does it seem like the lines should be at the same height at the inside (shooter's position) and different heights towards the outside? When you move a weapon up and down to aim higher and lower, that's the kind of arc you would naturally make. To align with these lines, wouldn't the shooter have to move their body higher and lower?

    I notice each line bisects a hole that appears to have been filled in. Would those holes have been some kind of mounting location for the weapon?
    Bryan

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    • #3
      Re: Markings at tower

      You think these were for old weapons like bow and arrow, or for modern use with rifles?
      Unless they were standing on something it would have been difficult to use it as aim.

      Is it just me, or does it seem like the lines should be at the same height at the inside (shooter's position) and different heights towards the outside?
      I guess that depends on what you want to shoot at. Both towers where I have seen this is located at a high position so they would mainly be shooting down at the enemy and then the lines make sense.

      To align with these lines, wouldn't the shooter have to move their body higher and lower?
      Yes to shoot downwards, because the tower is located at a high position:



      I notice each line bisects a hole that appears to have been filled in. Would those holes have been some kind of mounting location for the weapon?
      I don't think they are filled in but only some wear on the bricks. It might have been used for some kind of mount.

      There are several other holes in the wall around the "window" which are not found normally, so there might have been some kind of weapon positioned in each window.
      Last edited by Kim; 06-23-2010, 02:20 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: Markings at tower

        Originally posted by Kim View Post
        like can be seen in some 20th century fortifications as well.
        It is real hard to guess what weapon had been mounted , it will be great if someone find out a example of picture from 20th century fortifications.
        BTW, Is this lines mark in this high tower you showed?I shall post this puzzle to Chinese forum after your confirmation.

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        • #5
          Re: Markings at tower

          BTW, Is this lines mark in this high tower you showed?I shall post this puzzle to Chinese forum after your confirmation.
          It's from this tower:



          Here's a picture from Taolinkou:



          I'm not sure if there are some markings at the lines at Taolinkou - sorry for the bad quality:



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          • #6
            Re: Markings at tower

            Originally posted by Kim View Post
            It's from this tower:
            This puzzle had been posted in Chinese forum,link as:

            http://www.thegreatwall.com.cn/phpbb...6202&forumid=1

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            • #7
              Re: Markings at tower

              Thanks Kim for today's puzzle

              Are there any corresponding holes opposite the ones in your picture?
              If so the three holes (with three others opposit) are probably for a 'spill', for mounting arms which are too heavy to carry and aim by one man.
              Think about heavy crossbow, small catapult, heavy musket or very light artillery. In case there is no holes at all, like at Taolinkou, the use of a standing mount is probable too (tripod) No doubt the man handling such arms had to stand on woodblocks, barrels or chests for aiming at the enemy.

              The three lines might indicate:
              Most horizontal: other side of the valley
              Middle one: enemy side of the river
              Most vertical one: friendly side of the river
              (just an example, could be any target or area visible from this window, it is hard to see on such close-up pics what target is outside)

              If the signs above the lines are Chinese Karakters, they might even explain those targets by words: literally it can say: 'road', 'hilltop', 'river' or whatever.

              When using their personal bow, crossbow or fire arms, soldiers would know how to aim at distant targets. In the case of special, heavy weapons such lines on the wall, and texts, can be a very efficient help, especially for conscripts or newcomers in an artillerytower who have not much experience with heavy weapons or the area around their post.

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              • #8
                Re: Markings at tower

                Are there any corresponding holes opposite the ones in your picture?
                There might be. If we go there in September I'll try to pay more attention to that.

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