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  • Photos! Top beacon tower

    Comparing to the other towers at Jiumenkou this one (40
    Last edited by Kim; 09-19-2009, 03:32 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Top beacon tower

    It's definitely an interesting tower! How many towers have you seen without any windows? It looks really unusual to me. Also it appears to be more tapered than usual. These are features that I can recall seeing only at Qinglongxia, which is definitely an early Ming Dynasty Great Wall.
    Bryan

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    • #3
      Re: Top beacon tower

      It's definitely an interesting tower! How many towers have you seen without any windows? It looks really unusual to me. Also it appears to be more tapered than usual. These are features that I can recall seeing only at Qinglongxia, which is definitely an early Ming Dynasty Great Wall.
      These towers are not very uncommon. Looking at my pictures they can also be found at Jiaoshan and Huachangyu, but normally there is not so many bricks. This one is about half brick while the others are maybe 1/3 bricks.

      The late Ming beacons towers seems to be very much like a normal tower but with a high placed door.

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      • #4
        Re: Top beacon tower

        [QUOTE=Kim;6644]Comparing to the other towers at Jiumenkou this one (40
        Last edited by andarchen; 09-20-2009, 04:28 AM.

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        • #5
          Re: Top beacon tower

          _Very_ interesting insights. Do we have a list of typical properties for wall, towers and fortresses for "early Ming"? What time is exactly meant by "early Ming"?


          -chinoook
          chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
          chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
          chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

          The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

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          • #6
            Re: Top beacon tower

            Originally posted by andarchen View Post
            As i knew that all old towers to be covered with bricks at same period of Ming dynasty , and there is only hollow and solid difference.The left one near GW is solid tower , and right high one is hollow tower , both of them should be reconstructed at same time.
            I don't think so. This is another style and why would they build two towers so close to each other if not because they later choose a better position. The view from the top tower is much better.

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            • #7
              Re: Top beacon tower

              Originally posted by chinoook View Post
              _Very_ interesting insights. Do we have a list of typical properties for wall, towers and fortresses for "early Ming"? What time is exactly meant by "early Ming"?


              -chinoook
              Early Ming: Hongwu periode (1368-1398)

              Late Ming: Wanli periode (1572-1620)

              Very rough classification (based on eastern Hebei):

              Early Ming wall and tower: mainly stone. Base of tower: Big stones and rubbels

              Late Ming wall and tower: mainly brick. Base of tower: regular cut granite stones (Ashlar).
              Last edited by Kim; 09-20-2009, 12:40 PM.

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