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  • Photos! Jianganlingguan photos

    A few photos from Jianganlingguan. The mountains are steep on both side of the pass so I only stopped to take some photos before continuing to Liangjiawan.

    The fortress gate at Jianganlingguan. A large part of the fortress wall seems to be preserved.



    Remnants of a tower close to the river. In the background the wall continues up the mountain.



    The wall on the northern side of the river.



    A view from the enemy side.



    The wall itself is not very well preserved here, but on the north side of the river three well preserved towers can be seen.


  • #2
    Re: Jianganlingguan photos

    Originally posted by Kim View Post
    Remnants of a tower close to the river. In the background the wall continues up the mountain.
    This one puzzles me:


    How can ik look so clean, so wellpreserved?
    Looks like some ancient desertmonument that has been kept clean by very dry atmosphere. Or is this towerbase restored?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Jianganlingguan photos

      Originally posted by Lodewijk View Post
      This one puzzles me:
      [ATTACH]1108[/ATTACH]

      How can ik look so clean, so wellpreserved?
      Looks like some ancient desertmonument that has been kept clean by very dry atmosphere. Or is this towerbase restored?
      It is not uncommon to see this kind of well preserved tower base close to villages.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Jianganlingguan photos

        So is there a connection between village and well preserved towerbase?
        Or do you mean the builders used the best available stone for towers at the most vulnerable part of the wall, which is down at the bottom of a valley or pass, which is also the place to build a village?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Jianganlingguan photos

          Originally posted by Lodewijk View Post
          So is there a connection between village and well preserved towerbase?
          Or do you mean the builders used the best available stone for towers at the most vulnerable part of the wall, which is down at the bottom of a valley or pass, which is also the place to build a village?
          The tower base is much more durable than bricks so even after the bricks have disappeared the base is still there. Sometimes the wall passes a small village so it's easy to see how well preserved the tower base is - but it's constructed by the same material as the rest of the towers. Probably the bricks from the tower have been removed to build houses and fences.

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          • #6
            Re: Jianganlingguan photos

            Originally posted by Lodewijk View Post
            This one puzzles me:
            [ATTACH]1108[/ATTACH]

            How can ik look so clean, so wellpreserved?
            Looks like some ancient desertmonument that has been kept clean by very dry atmosphere. Or is this towerbase restored?
            Here's an example from Hekou:

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Jianganlingguan photos

              The similarity is clear and even the similarity of how you took both pics!

              Both towerbases must be build by standard regulations (in the same era?)
              But still the first towerbase looks most perfect, I can see not even the smalles space between any of the blocks, almost like a 'cyclopic wall' from Archa

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Jianganlingguan photos

                Both towerbases must be build by standard regulations (in the same era?)
                Both in Qinhuangdao, but a very common design.

                [QUOTE]But still the first towerbase looks most perfect, I can see not even the smalles space between any of the blocks, almost like a 'cyclopic wall' from Archa

                Comment

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