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  • #16
    Re: About a wall

    You guys are giving me exactly the type of information that I am looking for. Thank you.

    Before I say anything else, I would like to clarify one point. I do not have a problem with rock climbing, I just do not see any attraction in it. I will do it as a means to an end, but I would not go rock climbing just for the sake of going rock climbing. Like I said, I am not interested in it as a sport - good luck to those who do.

    If people think that Eagle Flies Facing Upwards is do-able solo, I will approach it, take a look and maybe have a go. Should I decide against it, and if there is no-one else in the vicinity at the time to team up with, I will look for a work-round. Although there may not be a reasonable detour if I need it, it does look like I can back-track and take a couple of lengthier paths. Can anyone confirm that?

    The fall that we can see in photo 1691 is a different proposition. If Robtrek says that he would not climb that with a partner, that is good enough for me. No point in trying on my own. I will get as close as I can for photos and leave it at that. My objective is simply to take pictures of as much of this wall as possible and to enjoy myself.

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    • #17
      Re: About a wall

      It can't be avoided if you want to stay on the wall. Of course, you can go down into the valley for a bit and come back up further west. Doing so misses the west side of EFFU and an extent of the wall either side.

      Lenscap, you're right to be cautious. People do stupid stuff up there all the time, not just at Jiankou. Spend enough time up there and you will, without fail, see people fall, see people dislodge rocks (and do it yourself, it is almost unavoidable no matter how careful/considerate you are) and see people struggling because they're in the wrong kind of clothing/shoes or didn't bring enough water.

      How about this - if you plan to head west along the wall there.

      Look carefully at the captions to Robtrek's photos. When you reach the part where the Tian Ti begins (explained in almost his first photo) you should find a big pile of rubble at the base. There is a clear path, you climb down the rubble to your right (as you look up the Stair). and get on the path . It takes you down through the forest. After a bit, not long, it intersects the uphill path. Go up there, hit the wall, turn right, and the second tower you reach is Eagles Fly Facing Upwards. This is the safe way to reach it.

      Back track, regain that path you came up (ie go back, pass one tower, in the saddle on the left where the wall is broken open, just before it goes uphill, that's the path you came up). Head downhill. Eventually, somewhere on your left, before you get all the way down to the valley, you should find a path heading uphill on the left (westwards). It has one of those "leave only footprints" signs, I think.

      That path should take you past Eagles FFU, way past it and you will regain the wall further along, beyond the bit where you would need to climb down that big cliff. It's been 3 years since I took it but I think it is there. From the point where you regain the wall, heading west, you can reach the Beijing Knot relatively easily, and then if you have managed your time carefully, you will be able to backtrack your way down to Xizhazi. Note, it would not be possible to make it this far and still get back to Mutianyu in a day. Even to make it this far needs an early start from MTY, especially if you've not been here before (making navigation that much trickier).

      It's always a bit of trial and error up there, which is part of what makes it fun. Take the proper safety precautions (you seem like you know what you're up to, but for other readers: most importantly, stay within your personal safety limits, leave enough daylight to exit, note where the downpaths are as you pass them, and never ever go without a flashlight). Getting caught out in the dark happens to the best of them; it certainly happened to me, right on the backside of EFFU one night, looking for the way down!
      If you're tired of the Great Wall, you're tired of life.
      Journeys, &c

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      • #18
        Re: About a wall

        And, I want to emphasize two things:
        1. I *think* that path I described exists and goes where I said it goes, beneath EFFU towards the west; and
        2. What I told robtrek, that there isn't a way to avoid that bit under the overhanging stair on the west of EFFU, is only to the best of my knowledge. I wish there was a detour right there but I've never found it.

        Anyone know different?
        If you're tired of the Great Wall, you're tired of life.
        Journeys, &c

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        • #19
          Re: About a wall

          Comments understood and appreciated Bianfuxia. If anyone can add any comments on these points it would be helpful.

          Looking at the pictures of the area in general and the surroundings at these specific locations, this is my type of country and I am well within my comfort zone. If there is a possible path or route I am happy to look for it. If others confirm that there is a natural barrier that is impassable to all but a team of mountaineers, there is no point in looking.

          I normally go from A to B by whatever route is most convenient for me on that day. This is different in as much as I am following a specific line through the countryside. I usually only do that when I am following the remnants of a pack-horse route to a bridge or the remains of a stage coach route to some isolated and abandoned town.

          If I go off route I am fine - and I do know when where and why to give up, and how to back-track - trust me on that point. I just do not want to waste my time if there is no chance of getting through.

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          • #20
            Re: About a wall

            I think that I am ready. I will be setting off in two days.

            One additional question. Can I re-stock with bottled water in Xizhazi or do I have to bring it out from Beijing? I have had experience of some of the quaint ideas of what is drinkable in other parts of Asia!

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            • #21
              Re: About a wall

              If you ask nicely at a guesthouse you should be able to top up from their "hu" or big thermos, or even buy a bottle of drinking water.
              If you're tired of the Great Wall, you're tired of life.
              Journeys, &c

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: About a wall

                Good luck and be sure to post a few pics, let us know how you got on!
                If you're tired of the Great Wall, you're tired of life.
                Journeys, &c

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: About a wall

                  Many thanks to everyone for your help. Maybe I might meet one of you out there.

                  I will be off-line after tomorrow night and will be back with some photos at the end of the month

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                  • #24
                    Re: About a wall

                    Just got back from China.
                    Not exactly the extended hike that I planned, but I did get to a couple of sections of the wall and managed to take a look at a couple of other routes that I will tackle next time.
                    I have posted some brief notes and a couple of photos under the Huairou District section of this forum.

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