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  • Damage on the Great Wall

    I was just reported the following:

    "Mining firm 'damages' Great Wall

    Parts of the Great Wall near Beijing have been restored
    A gold mining firm is being investigated after part of one of the oldest sections of the Great Wall of China was damaged during prospecting.
    About 100 metres of the wall was badly damaged, and investigators from the Chinese government and regional police now plan to bring charges.
    The damage was originally discovered in September and work halted, but officials later found it had restarted.
    The damaged section, in Inner Mongolia, dates from the Qin Dynasty (BC221).
    Hohhot Kekao Mining Company is alleged to have knocked two holes, covering a total area of 300 sq m, through the Wall.
    The head of the regional cultural relics bureau, Wang Dafang, told the Associated Press news agency that the damage was "irreparable".
    "Some people think the only part of the Great Wall that needs to be protected is in Beijing," said Mr Wang.
    "But although the Inner Mongolia wall is more modest, it carries the same significance."
    Police in Hohhot City, the capital of Inner Mongolia, are now collecting evidence. Company officials could face up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.
    China has special laws to prevent damage to the wall, which is a Unesco World Heritage Site.
    Five miners were jailed last year for damaging part of the Inner Mongolia wall, the only people jailed to date under the preservation laws.
    The wall, built by a number of emperors over many centuries, extends in different sections more than 8,850km (5,487 miles) across northern China."


    -chinoook
    chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
    chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
    chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

    The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

  • #2
    Re: Damage on the Great Wall

    Originally posted by chinoook View Post
    I was just reported the following:

    "Mining firm 'damages' Great Wall

    Parts of the Great Wall near Beijing have been restored
    A gold mining firm is being investigated after part of one of the oldest sections of the Great Wall of China was damaged during prospecting.
    About 100 metres of the wall was badly damaged, and investigators from the Chinese government and regional police now plan to bring charges.
    The damage was originally discovered in September and work halted, but officials later found it had restarted.
    The damaged section, in Inner Mongolia, dates from the Qin Dynasty (BC221).
    Hohhot Kekao Mining Company is alleged to have knocked two holes, covering a total area of 300 sq m, through the Wall.
    The head of the regional cultural relics bureau, Wang Dafang, told the Associated Press news agency that the damage was "irreparable".
    "Some people think the only part of the Great Wall that needs to be protected is in Beijing," said Mr Wang.
    "But although the Inner Mongolia wall is more modest, it carries the same significance."
    Police in Hohhot City, the capital of Inner Mongolia, are now collecting evidence. Company officials could face up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.
    China has special laws to prevent damage to the wall, which is a Unesco World Heritage Site.
    Five miners were jailed last year for damaging part of the Inner Mongolia wall, the only people jailed to date under the preservation laws.
    The wall, built by a number of emperors over many centuries, extends in different sections more than 8,850km (5,487 miles) across northern China."


    -chinoook
    Its great that there are now laws in place to protect the wall, but the punishments and penalties are still too mild. It seems that many of the reports of damage seem to come from Inner Mongolia, I was just reading a report the other day that was dated July about some damage to a Jin wall
    http://life.globaltimes.cn/travel/2009-07/446065.html

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Damage on the Great Wall

      Originally posted by PWCCA View Post
      Its great that there are now laws in place to protect the wall, but the punishments and penalties are still too mild. It seems that many of the reports of damage seem to come from Inner Mongolia, I was just reading a report the other day that was dated July about some damage to a Jin wall
      http://life.globaltimes.cn/travel/2009-07/446065.html
      Hi,

      thx for the bad news. Could you please copy the text to this thread since the link probably will go away soon. It could be of interest and use in the future.


      -chinoook
      chinoook's 1st law: Structurally weak walls tend to have double structures.
      chinoook's 2nd law: Newer walls are built next older walls, not over them.
      chinoook's 3rd law: Similar problems lead to similar solutions.

      The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of people, who have not viewed the world. (Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), German naturalist and explorer)

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Damage on the Great Wall

        Originally posted by chinoook View Post
        Hi,

        thx for the bad news. Could you please copy the text to this thread since the link probably will go away soon. It could be of interest and use in the future.


        -chinoook
        Part of Jin Dynasty Great Wall damaged
        Source: Xinhua [14:47 July 13 2009]


        The road construction site,15 meters away from the main body of the Great Wall

        A section of Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) Great Wall in northeast China has been severely damaged by a road construction project, according to the local cultural authorities on Friday.

        "The section of the Great Wall in Heilongjiang's border region with Inner Mongolia has been irrevocably damaged," said Zhao Pingchun, deputy head of the relic protection office under the Heilongjiang Provincial Culture Bureau.

        Heavy construction traffic has damaged the supporting walls and ditches of the Great Wall according to a Xinhua reporter on location.

        Wang Dafang, a relic protection official with the Inner Mongolia regional culture bureau, confirmed that "damages were made by a road construction project on the Inner Mongolia side of the Great Wall."

        The officials said Friday the construction on both sides of the Great Wall has been stopped. Authorities from Inner Mongolia and Heilongjiang are investigating the damages.

        "Workers have dug footing grooves 14 meters long and 10.5 meters wide for the building support beams for a viaduct, which are only 15 meters away from the main body of the Great Wall," said Zhao, who made a field investigation on the Great Wall damage in Gannan County, Heilongjiang.

        Wu Jie, a curator in an archaeological museum in Arong Banner, Inner Mongolia, said that big holes were dug five meters away from the main body of the Great Wall.

        The cultural authorities said workers were building an over head intersection of the Arong Banner-Boketu Highway on the Inner Mongolia side of the Great Wall and the Qiqihar-Gannan Highway on the Heilongjiang side.

        The viaduct was to span the section of the Great Wall.

        The 5,500-km Jin Dynasty Great Wall spans 4,600 km in China, and has parts of Mongolia and Russia.

        The Chinese section of the Great Wall was added to the list of protected state key cultural relic sites in 2001.

        However, when asked by a Xinhua reporter, a construction worker at the site said he knew nothing about the protection status.

        Zhao said construction firms have evaded China's Relic Protection Law, which requires project managers to report the project plan to the relic protection authority for approval before carrying out the work.

        The Jin Dynasty Great Wall was built by the Nuzhen nomadic to prevent invasion from Mongols. The Great Wall was also called the Boundary Ditch of the Jin, since it was formed by digging ditches, within which the walls were built.

        Damaging the state key cultural relic site is punishable by fines or jail terms.

        Five miners were sentenced to one-to-three years in Inner Mongolia last year for causing damages to a section of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Great Wall while using heavy machinery for mining. So far, the case is the only Great Wall case that resulted in jail time for the offenders.


        Part of Jin Dynasty Great Wall damaged


        Part of Jin Dynasty Great Wall damaged
        Bryan

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